Ecology Vocabulary

 

Ecology:Study of interactions of living organisms with one another and with their physical environment

 

Habitat:place where a particular population of a species lives

 

Community:the many different species that live together in a habitat

 

Ecosystem:a community and all of the physical aspects of its habitat (soil, air, water, weather

 

Abiotic:the physical aspects of a habitat

 

Biotic:the living organisms of a habitat

 

Biodiversity:number of species living within an ecosystem

 

Pioneer Species:the first organisms to live in a new habitat; usually small, fast growing plants

 

Succession:regular progression of species replacement

 

Primary Succession:succession that occurs where plants have not grown before (ex:volcanoes, receding glaciers)

 

Secondary Succession:succession that occurs in areas where there has been previous growth (ex: forest fires, forest clearings)

 

Primary Productivity:the rate at which organic material is produced by photosynthetic organisms in an ecosystem

 

Autotroph:Organisms that make their own food, producers

 

Heterotroph:Organisms that consume producers for food, consumers

 

Producer:organisms that first capture energy and that make their own food (plants)

 

Consumer:organisms that consume producers for food (animals)

 

Trophic Level:a specific level in an ecosystem based on the organismís source of energy

 

Food Chain:the path of energy through the trophic levels of an ecosystem

 

Herbivores:second trophic level, animals that eat plants or other primary producer

 

Carnivores:third trophic level, animals that eat herbivores

 

Omnivores:both herbivores and carnivores

 

Detritivores:obtain energy from organic waste and dead bodies, release nutrients back into environment (decomposers: worms, bacteria, fungi)

 

Food Web:a complicated, interconnected group of food chains

 

Biomass:the dry weight of tissue and other organic matter found in a specific ecosystem

 

Predation:the act of one organism feeding on another

 

Symbiosis:two or more species live together in a close, long-term association

 

Parasitism:one organism feeds on and usually lives on or in another, does not usually kill the host (ticks)

 

Mutualism:a symbiotic relationship in which both species benefit (ants and aphids)

 

Commensalism:one species benefits and the other is neither harmed nor helped

 

Fundamental Niche:the entire range of conditions an organism is potentially able to occupy

 

Realized Niche:the part of its fundamental niche that a species occupies

 

Biome:major biological community that occurs over a large area of land

 

 

Ecology:Study of interactions of living organisms with one another and with their physical environment

 

Habitat:place where a particular population of a species lives

 

Community:the many different species that live together in a habitat

 

Ecosystem:a community and all of the physical aspects of its habitat (soil, air, water, weather

 

Abiotic:the physical aspects of a habitat

 

Biotic:the living organisms of a habitat

 

Biodiversity:number of species living within an ecosystem

 

Pioneer Species:the first organisms to live in a new habitat; usually small, fast growing plants

 

Succession:regular progression of species replacement

 

Primary Succession:succession that occurs where plants have not grown before (ex:volcanoes, receding glaciers)

 

Secondary Succession:succession that occurs in areas where there has been previous growth (ex: forest fires, forest clearings)

 

Primary Productivity:the rate at which organic material is produced by photosynthetic organisms in an ecosystem

 

Autotroph:Organisms that make their own food, producers

 

Heterotroph:Organisms that consume producers for food, consumers

 

Producer:organisms that first capture energy and that make their own food (plants)

 

Consumer:organisms that consume producers for food (animals)

 

Trophic Level:a specific level in an ecosystem based on the organismís source of energy

 

Food Chain:the path of energy through the trophic levels of an ecosystem

 

Herbivores:second trophic level, animals that eat plants or other primary producer

 

Carnivores:third trophic level, animals that eat herbivores

 

Omnivores:both herbivores and carnivores

 

Detritivores:obtain energy from organic waste and dead bodies, release nutrients back into environment (decomposers: worms, bacteria, fungi)

 

Food Web:a complicated, interconnected group of food chains

 

Biomass:the dry weight of tissue and other organic matter found in a specific ecosystem

 

Predation:the act of one organism feeding on another

 

Symbiosis:two or more species live together in a close, long-term association

 

Parasitism:one organism feeds on and usually lives on or in another, does not usually kill the host (ticks)

 

Mutualism:a symbiotic relationship in which both species benefit (ants and aphids)

 

Commensalism:one species benefits and the other is neither harmed nor helped

 

Biome:major biological community that occurs over a large area of land

 

Introduced Species:an organism that is not native to an area, but is brought there intentionally or unintentionally by humans

 

Niche:how and where an organism lives and the job it performs.This includes diet, activity, how it affects energy flow in systems.THIS IS NOT THE SAME AS HABITAT